Heritage and identity: Glavašev's House - Jewel of Vranjeva history

Discover the rich heritage and cultural identity of Vranjevo through the story of the House of Glavas. This architecturally significant building is a symbol of the past and identity of this area. With its classic variant of the classicist style, rich decoration and deep roots in history, the house exudes character and tells the story of the times that shaped the community. Read more about its characteristics, architectural details and role in the cultural life of Vranjevo. The House of Glavas not only preserves heritage, but also inspires a vision of the future, encouraging awareness of the importance of preserving cultural identity for generations to come.

Preface

Preface

The rich cultural heritage, including residential structures built or inhabited by notable personalities, now constitutes a cultural value that should be preserved and presented to the wider public. In this way, the societal community, starting from each individual, becomes aware that cultural heritage, regardless of the space and time of its origin, carries the values that highlight our local specificities, cultural differences, and constitute the distinctiveness of a nation or a smaller social community. Its preservation and protection should become a crucial factor in determining the priorities of development and progress in any society. The more affluent and advanced societies are, the more developed is the concern and awareness of people about the necessity of preserving their cultural identity.

Historical Data
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Historical Data

In the mid-18th century, after the disarmament of the Potisje-Pomorišje border, at the initiative of the Hungarian nobility, the Viennese court offered the Serbs the option to move to Banat or to remain under Hungarian county administration. Some Serbs relocated to Russia, while others moved to Banat. In northern Banat, six border guard units were established at that time to maintain order, defense, and protection from the Tisza River, facilitating regular river traffic. The headquarters of one of these units was in Vranjevo, stretching from the ruins of the Bečej fortress to the former Bakta (Pakto) lake near the Tisza port called Gustoš, slightly north of the present large warehouse on the embankment near the Tisza at the exit from Novi Bečej. Later, the village of Vranovo developed there, also called the Vranjevo trench. After the disarmament of the border, many Serbian border guards from Stari Bečej, Bačko Petrovo Selo, and Mol settled in the trench.

The House of Vladimir Glavaš

The House of Vladimir Glavaš

The Glavaš family house in Vranjevo, built in the first half of the 19th century, represents one of the rare examples of a wealthier civic house from that period in Central Banat. On the same plot, there is also an auxiliary building on the regulatory line of Svetozar Marković Street. Across the street from the house in the same street, there is a Roman Catholic church.

The house is constructed in the style of a simplified version of classicism as a single-story corner building, positioned on the regulatory line of Josif Marinković and Svetozar Marković streets, extending with a narrower side. Below the central part of the building is a cellar with a semi-circular vault. On the courtyard side, there is a deep masonry porch from which the staff entered the kitchen. The eaves have a notched top, forming a trapezoidal shape. The roof is double-sloped, steep, and covered with clay roof tiles.

Interior
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Interior

The layout of the rooms is functional and adapted to the needs of a middle-class family. It exudes warmth and comfort. From the central entrance hall (foyer), one enters the living (reception) room, the girls' (bachelor's) room, and the kitchen. A manually operated bell in the corner of the hall served to announce the entry of guests or to summon the servants. There is also a fireplace for heating adjacent rooms. The kitchen is connected to the hall by narrow, single-winged wooden doors and a small opening in the wall with metal doors that opened as needed, serving as a counter through which the servants would serve. In the kitchen, there is an open chimney and a brick stove for food preparation. The servants' room, an extension of the kitchen, faces the side street. To the right of the living room, facing the main street, is the bedroom, and to the left is the study. The bedroom is connected to the girls' (bachelor's) room, which has a built-in stove.

Renovation of Vladimir Glavaš's House
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Renovation of Vladimir Glavaš's House

Condition before the start of the works
The condition of Glavaš's house was very poor until the end of 2006. Damages occurred due to lack of maintenance and exposure to atmospheric conditions. The house had not been used for an extended period, and after a break-in, it was closed and inaccessible to visitors.

The old clay tile roof was in a very bad state, resulting in leaks, deformation of the roof structure, and changes in the roof shape, causing depressions. Gutters and downspouts had collapsed, and atmospheric elements directly contributed to the peeling of plaster. Damage to the walls occurred due to capillary moisture. The facade's plastic elements (pillars with capitals and geometric ornaments on parapets) were in relatively good condition. The existing metal protective grilles on windows and basement covers showed peeling paint and noticeable corrosion. Most window panes were shattered. The entrance gate for vehicles was in very poor condition, with damaged wooden parts and peeling paint. The brick floor in the old-fashioned "herringbone" style in the courtyard had sunk due to settling of the earth foundation, and the wooden steps at the entrance had twisted.

Exhibition Setup of the Memorial Museum

Exhibition Setup of the Memorial Museum

The concept of the permanent exhibition at the Memorial Museum - Glavaševa House in Vranjevo is designed to reflect the interior, along with the external appearance, of a wealthier citizen's house from the 19th century. Since the philanthropist Dr. Vladimir Glavaš was born and lived in the house until his death in 1909, care was taken to clean, conserve, restore, and exhibit all found objects, parts of old furniture, old photographs, and oil paintings as part of the museum's permanent exhibition.