Novi Bečej and Vranjevo through History

Explore the extraordinary past of Novi Bečej and Vranjevo through the pages of the book 'Novi Bečej and Vranjevo through History.' Uncover political events, economic development, and cultural heritage of these Banat towns through richly documented stories. Follow the evolution from the earliest days to the present, delving into the intricate threads of political intrigues, economic transformations, and cultural ascensions. Experience the past through the eyes of the author as the pages of the book unfold before you, providing a unique perspective on the life and legacy of these significant locales.

Civil School in Novi Bečej
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Civil School in Novi Bečej

The Civil School in Austro-Hungary aimed to prepare young people for work in the economy. Unlike lower gymnasiums, which provided knowledge that needed further schooling to supplement, the curriculum of civil schools was designed to provide comprehensive training. Young people who completed civil school acquired knowledge that enabled them to navigate more easily when entering crafts and trade.

Therefore, civil schools prepared personnel for inclusion in economic life, with the possibility of further education in secondary vocational schools being a secondary consideration. The curriculum of civil schools provided a solid foundation, so graduates of civil schools in secondary vocational schools could achieve success comparable to those with completed lower gymnasium education.
Guided by this task, the traders and craftsmen of Novi Bečej initiated the establishment of a civil school in Novi Bečej to ensure a more educated workforce. Soon, on May 10, 1900, a request was submitted to the county school inspectorate in Veliki Bečkerek to assist them in obtaining a resolution from the Ministry of Education in Budapest to establish a civil school. For unknown reasons, the educational authorities of that time did not respond to the desire of the people of Novi Bečej and Vranjevo. However, pressured by the need for a good economic youth, citizens submitted a new request. On November 21, 1907, the request was granted, and the school began operating on September 6, 1908, with separate first male and female classes. Separate departments remained until the 1921-22 academic year when the school became coeducational. In its initial years, the school operated in the building of the landowner Dunđerski, located at the site of the present-day Tiski cvet hotel. The number of students increased rapidly, and that building could not meet the needs, so the municipality of Novi Bečej bought land on the main street on June 26, 1909, to build a new building for the civil school. Just over a year after buying the land, on December 8, 1910, the school was consecrated and handed over for use. This is the building of today's Eight-Year School "Miloje Čiplić" in Novi Bečej. The construction of the school cost 290,000 crowns.
Higher grades were opened year by year, so the school already had four classes of male and four classes of female civil schools in the 1911/12 academic year. With that number of classes, the school continued to operate until the 1920/21 academic year. The teaching was conducted in the Hungarian language. Hungarian was used until September 1, 1919, when Serbian was introduced, but the departments remained divided into male and female.
At the end of the 1920/21 school year, separate departments were abolished, and from the 1921/22 school year, the school operated as a mixed civil school with Serbian as the teaching language. That year, the school had one hundred and sixty students, and that number remained approximately the same until World War II. The municipalities of Novi Bečej and Vranjevo maintained the school according to the number of enrolled students.
The number of students ranged between one hundred and fifty and one hundred and seventy, with the exception of the years when a private gymnasium existed in Novi Bečej, when the number of civil school students decreased. For example, in the 1930/31 school year, 121 students were enrolled. Already the next year, when the lower grades of the gymnasium were abolished, and in 1932 the gymnasium as a whole, 163 students were enrolled in the civil school.
The teaching staff in the 1932/33 school year consisted of twelve teachers, eight regular and four honorary. In addition to the names of the teachers and basic information, we will also present how many hours each teacher had per week.

Vuksan L. Radović, principal, 18 years of service, taught history to classes Ia, Ib, and II, a total of 6 hours per week.
Margita O. Sauer, teacher, 25 years of service, taught German language in all classes and handicrafts in classes II and III, a total of 19 hours per week. She was responsible for keeping the collection of handicrafts in the school. Class teacher of class II.
Aleksandra S. Tatić, teacher, 17 years of service, taught Serbo-Croatian language to classes II, III, and IV, History to class III, and Civics to class V. A total of 20 hours per week. Class teacher of class III. She also served as a librarian and translator in the School.
Lazar J. Prodanović, teacher, 13 years of service. He taught natural sciences to classes Ia and II, chemistry in classes III and IV, arithmetic in classes Ia and Ib, geometry in classes Ia and Ib, and male handicrafts in class IV. A total of 22 hours per week. Class teacher of class Ib, he also worked as a director, Red Cross commissioner, guardian of the natural science and chemistry collections, and male handicrafts collection.
Zlata D. Jovanović, teacher, 11 years of service. She taught geography to classes II and III, history to class IV, natural sciences to Ib, and drawing to classes Ia, II, III, and IV, a total of 22 hours per week. Class teacher of class Ia. She was in charge of the collections for history and geography, for drawing and writing, for musical instruments, and picture collections.
Margita N. Bastien, teacher, 6 years of service. She taught mathematics with geometry to classes II, III, and IV, and physics in classes III and IV, a total of 22 hours per week. Class teacher of class IV. Guardian of the collections for mathematics and physics and collections of various tools.
Vinka V. Radović, primary school teacher, 4 years of service. She taught geography to classes Ia and Ib, Serbo-Croatian language to Ia and Ib, home economics to classes Ia, Ib, II, III, and IV. A total of 21 hours per week. She had no other duties.
Jelena L. Prodanović, handicraft teacher, 5 years of service. She taught female handicrafts to classes Ia, Ib, II, III, and IV, drawing to class Ib, male handicrafts to classes Ia and Ib, and gymnastics in all classes. A total of 22 hours per week. She had no other duties.
Boško J. Pecarski, honorary catechist. Religious education in all classes, a total of 6 hours per week.
Artur F. Ambruš, honorary catechist. Religious education in all classes, a total of 6 hours per week.
Jakob P. Kobec, honorary teacher, singing in all classes, a total of 5 hours.
Miloš dr Stakić, doctor, hygiene in all classes, a total of 5 hours per week.
Parents of students paid tuition fees, which depended on the amount of annual taxes and ranged from 50 to 250 dinars per year.

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Miloje Čiplić